• The Lost Spirits Distillery Tour

    Pirates of the Caribbean meets high-tech rum-making in DTLA. 

     
    FROM THE Summer 2018 ISSUE
     

    The Lost Spirits Distillery tour shares the lore, magic and science behind creating rum and whiskey. 

  • The Lost Spirits Distillery Tour

    Pirates of the Caribbean meets high-tech rum-making in DTLA. 

     
    FROM THE Summer 2018 ISSUE
     

    The Lost Spirits Distillery tour shares the lore, magic and science behind creating rum and whiskey. 

"Unique" is a word that’s bandied about with abandon, often to describe experiences that are all too familiar. But it’s totally on point when talking about the tours offered by the Lost Spirits Distillery, what Timeout Magazine dubbed “a boozy theme park for adults.”

Let’s start with the fact that the year-old working distillery is located on a pretty deserted stretch of downtown LA, turning out whiskey and rum that has earned the industry’s top honors. Then, consider that Lost Spirits, which began in 2010 in Castroville, “the artichoke center of the world,” has perfected a technology that allows them to create a 20-year-aged rum in a mere seven days. You’ll learn just how they do that in a 90-minute tour that includes a journey by riverboat to Whisky Island, a ride on a carousel, encounters with TESSA, the disembodied voice of the operating system that runs the distillery, talking topiary triceratops and snarky tweeting mechanical birds. 

Even more wondrous is the science that the Lost Spirits team imparts, including how they’ve managed to recreate a fabled 1800’s whiskey by way of antique furniture made of a now extinct variety of chestnut that had once provided the wood for aging barrels. Along the way there are ample tastings. Groups can book a 12-person boat for a private tour; Disney and NASA’s Jet Propulsion lab are among those who have. 

The cost is $37 a person; book ahead since the popular tours sell out months in advance. 

The 36-room Atticus Hotel in McMinnville, Oregon, opened for business this past spring. The hotel features an on-site restaurant and bar, private dining in the Atticus Hotel Drawing Room, a boardroom for meetings of up to 16 people, a business center and a fitness room. Additional amenities include Dutch-style bicycles, electric-car charging stations, rooms with fireplaces and original artwork from local artists.