• Fisherman's Wharf Hooks Visitors with New and Renewed Venues

     
    FROM THE Spring 2018 ISSUE
     

    San Francisco’s iconic waterfront district received a pedestrian-friendly face-lift. 

  • Fisherman's Wharf Hooks Visitors with New and Renewed Venues

     
    FROM THE Spring 2018 ISSUE
     

    San Francisco’s iconic waterfront district received a pedestrian-friendly face-lift. 

  • Fisherman's Wharf Hooks Visitors with New and Renewed Venues

     
    FROM THE Spring 2018 ISSUE
     

    San Francisco’s iconic waterfront district received a pedestrian-friendly face-lift. 

  • Fisherman's Wharf Hooks Visitors with New and Renewed Venues

     
    FROM THE Spring 2018 ISSUE
     

    San Francisco’s iconic waterfront district received a pedestrian-friendly face-lift. 

  • Fisherman's Wharf Hooks Visitors with New and Renewed Venues

     
    FROM THE Spring 2018 ISSUE
     

    San Francisco’s iconic waterfront district received a pedestrian-friendly face-lift. 

First-time visitors to San Francisco are drawn to the Fisherman’s Wharf waterfront district like moths to a flame—in part for the seafood, in part for the souvenir stores, in part for the people- and boat-watching, in part for the history and in part for the attractions that provide often kitschy diversion. Too-narrow sidewalks and heavy traffic in the past made the experience far from ideal. But a seven-year, $300 million infusion in public and private capital improvements has catapulted Fisherman’s Wharf into pedestrian-friendly renaissance mode. 

Planners steering their convention guests to the district can recommend numerous new venues, including Surisan, a KoreanAmerican fusion restaurant; Hotel Zephyr, an oh-so-hip boutique property with a shipping-container aesthetic; the newly opened, nautically themed Hotel Zoe in the shell of the former Tuscan Hotel; the recently relocated Cartoon Art Museum; the Hard Rock Café, recently reopened following $8 million in renovations (including a private dining venue); and the revamped Fisherman’s Grotto #9, a historic, Venetian-themed seafood restaurant. In addition, the iconic Alioto’s restaurant has opened a casual street-level eatery called Café 8, while San Francisco Maritime Park has debuted a new visitor center that’s available for private events.

Ghirardelli Square, home of the famed chocolate company, is also getting a host of new tenants this spring. They include San Francisco Brewing Company, the district’s first craft-brewing facility; an indoor, 18-hole mini golf course called Subpar; and Cheese School of San Francisco, a café-cumcooking-class operation available for group lessons and team-building. 

And don’t write off Fisherman’s Wharf as purely a tourist destination. The 30-squareblock neighborhood is still home to 185 active fishing vessels and 22 seafood distribution companies, says Rachel Brown, marketing and communications director for the Fisherman’s Wharf Community Benefit District. On average, she reports, some 24,383 people visit the district on a daily basis—a number that can swell as high as 120,000, depending on season and weather. 

Located in San Jose, California, Santana Row is the place to meet, play and connect in Silicon Valley. The pedestrian-friendly destination is only 10 minutes to the San Jose Convention Center and San Jose International Airport. The neighborhood is filled with condominiums, shops, restaurants, spas, and a movie theater. And at the core of it all is Hotel Valencia Santana Row—the only hotel in this unique entertainment district and the top hotel in San Jose according to Conde Nast Traveler.   

 

If you want to boost attendance at a meeting or conference, try these four letters: N.A.P.A. And while the Northern California wine region has more than enough activities to keep attendees busy when they’re not in meetings—475 wineries, to begin with—the downtown heart of the region is introducing new experiences this fall. Here’s a sampling:

 

San Francisco is seeing marked increases in visitor volume, visitor spending, group business, and hotel occupancy this year compared to 2021. However, visitor volume will not return to pre-pandemic levels until 2024, and global visitation will not reach 2019 levels until 2025. Those projections were shared by the San Francisco Travel Association at its Annual Visitor and Lodging Forecast Forum held on Aug. 24 at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts.