How LA Celebrated the Solar Eclipse

Los Angeles experienced only partial darkness during the Great American Solar Eclipse. Still, the city celebrated with its usual festive community spirit. There were free viewing parties at the Griffith Observatory and the Glendale Community College Planetarium, at the physics and astronomy centers of UCLA, Cal State Long Beach and the University of California at Riverside. National Park Services Rangers led hikes at the LA State Historic Park in Downtown LA and at King Gillette Ranch in Calabasas. The Big Bear Valley Astronomical Society set up telescopes at Swim Beach. You could ride the gondola to the 11,000-foot summit at Mammoth Mountain or take the Palm Spring Aerial Tramway to the Mountain Station (elevation 8,516 feet) where the Mount San Jacinto State Park provided NASA-approved solar-viewing glasses and a telescope fitted with a solar filter.

And, of course, people gathered in backyards and gardens and rooftops everywhere, including at the High Rooftop Lounge at Hotel Erwin in Venice Beach, where the drinks menu included charcoal-activated Bloody Marys, Cosmic Mimosas and Total Eclipse Mai Tais.

The next total solar eclipse won’t be visible in the United Sates until April 24, 2024. But you don’t have to wait until then to enjoy a Solar Eclipse cocktail. Here, courtesy of Jose Cuervo Tequila is a recipe.

Total Especial Eclipse

2 oz. Jose Cuervo Especial
2 oz. orange juice
1 tsp. grenadine
1/2 oz. charcoal lemonade (available at juice shops)

Shake tequila and orange juice and pour into a rocks glass over ice. Mix charcoal lemonade and grenadine and slowly pour into the cocktail. Garnish with lime wedge.

Downtown Los Angeles has gone through a renaissance these past few years with a staggering number of hotels and restaurants opening or reinventing themselves. Among the most vibrant of these properties is The Mayfair Hotel, which brings a history, authenticity and creative energy that feels distinctly DTLA. The Mayfair was first established in 1926 and was the tallest building west of the Mississippi when it opened.

 

California is one of the most abundant agricultural regions in the world, but a startling number of residents aren’t always sure where their next meal will come from. According to Feeding America, the nation’s largest network of food banks, one in eight Californians struggles with hunger. The situation is especially startling for children; one in five is food insecure.

Hunger is not a supply problem, it’s a logistics challenge. And the meetings and events industry is full of logistics-minded people who are in a position to chip away at it.

 

There’s gold—and a Frank Lloyd Wright-designed meeting center—in them thar hills.