ON NEW YEAR’S EVE DECEMBER 2011, celebrity chef Govind Armstrong and restaurateur Brad Johnson opened Post & Beam in the Baldwin Hills-Crenshaw district section of Los Angeles. In a neighborhood better known for fast food, Armstrong’s farm-to-table cuisine was an immediate hit with the community, and a destination spot for anyone who appreciates artful Southern cooking. Both the food and the cocktails draw extensively from the herb and vegetable garden on the restaurant’s patio, and there’s no better spot in town to enjoy buttermilk fried chicken, shrimp grits and a garden-to glass libation such as the sunset Rosalia. “In the fall, the basils in our garden are bountiful and pair perfectly with the flavors of blood orange and ginger,” says Armstrong. “The sunset Rosalia, a colorful play on the sunset and the street where our restaurant is located, is crisp, tangy and sweet, all at the same time.”

INGREDIENTS
—3 leaves sweet basil
—3 leaves purple basil
—1.5 inch slice blood orange
—.5 oz. ginger syrup
—.5 oz. simple syrup
—1 oz. Key lime juice
—1.5 oz. Charbay vodka
—slice of jalapeño (optional)

DIRECTIONS
1. In a cocktail shaker, muddle basil and blood orange.
2. Add ice and the remaining ingredients.
3. Shake and strain into a coupe glass.
4. Garnish with jalapeño slice.
5. Enjoy!

Courtesy of POST & BEAM 

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