It’s not too early to start thinking about holiday gifts. One that you’ll want to keep on your radar is the three-bottle gift pack of grape-based mixers from Stolen Fruit. The Sonoma-based company launched just a few months ago with five different alcohol-free blends, for both cocktails and mocktails, made with a blend of verjus—the fresh-pressed juice from green grapes—varietal grape juice and grape skins. The holiday pack ($54) includes Lemongrass Ginger Sauvignon Blanc; Blood Orange Muscat; and Hibiscus Grenache.

Stolen Fruit makes mixology foolproof and delicious. For a sophisticated non-alohcohlic beverage, simply combine 2 ounces of the mixer with 6 ounces of sparkling water, stir and, if you’d like, garnish with a wedge of orange, lime or grapefruit for a garnish. For a spiked version, reduce the sparkling water to 4 ounces and add 2 ounces of your favorite spirit. Stolen Fruit makes both wine lovers and craft-cocktail aficionados happy. Adding to their versatility, the mixers are food friendly, pairing beautifully with every type of cuisine, from teriyaki salmon to grilled ribeye. stolenfruit.com

With a beachside locale and a laidback, surf-town vibe, Ventura County Coast is awash with inspiration for your next meeting and event. The region is home to four communities— Camarillo, Oxnard, Ventura, and Port Hueneme—and is ideal for groups from 10 to 1,000.  

 

The perfect holiday gift is beautiful, unique and filled with wonder. Gastro Obscura: A Food Adventurer's Guide is all of these things and more: a travel-lover’s delight with enough offbeat facts about food to spark countless conversations at the next cocktail party or event.

 

Green salad, chicken, two veggies and a starch—that might have been a reasonable meal to serve group attendees in the last century, but it won’t cut it in 2020. Today, guests expect that a growing range of dietary needs will be accommodated, whether they’re eating keto, vegan, paleo, gluten free or some combination of all four. And, in a time when tech employees enjoy gourmet in-house commissaries on the job, it takes some serious culinary pyrotechnics to impress them.